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National Awards

 

Appita L R Benjamin Medal

The Appita L R Benjamin Medal honours the late Louis Reginald Benjamin, CBE, a pioneer and leader in the development of the pulp and paper industry based on Australian eucalypts. It is an award designed to encourage technical excellence, innovation and achievement.

First awarded in 1971 and is an annual award to persons who have contributed in an outstanding way to the technical progress of the pulp and paper industry in Australia and New Zealand. The contribution should have been largely personal, and could be in research, development, engineering or management (provided the work managed was technical in nature). The nominee does not have to be a member of APPITA – the Technical Association of the Australian and New Zealand Pulp and Paper Industry Inc.

CSIRO winners are:

1999 AFW Wallis
1997 Robert Evans
1977 HG Higgins
1974 AJ Watson

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Farrer Memorial Medal

The Farrer Memorial Trust was established in 1911 to perpetuate the memory of William James Farrer and to encourage and inspire agricultural scientists. Initially it awarded scholarships for ‘study or research in agricultural problems’. Later it included the delivery of an annual oration and the presentation of the Farrer Memorial Medal to a distinguished agricultural scientist for service rendered in the fields of research, education or administration.

CSIRO winners are:

2014 Elizabeth Dennis
2010 Michael Poole
2007 Tony Fischer
2005 John Williams
1999 Jim Peacock
1992 EF (Ted) Henzell
1979 Lloyd Evans
1974 Helen Newton Turner
1973 Doug Waterhouse
1969 Clifford Stuart Christian
1968 Mark Hutton
1964 Colin Donald
1963 Sir Rutherford Robertson
1962 Sir Otto Frankel
1948 James Arthur Prescott

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Malcolm McIntosh Prize for Physical Scientist

The Malcolm McIntosh Prize [external link] for Physical Scientist of the Year was initiated in 2000. It is awarded to a scientist at an early stage in their career (within 10 years of completing their PhD).

The prize is awarded for an outstanding achievement in science that advances, or has the potential to advance, human welfare or benefits society. The Prize is awarded only to an individual and comprises a silver medallion and lapel pin, and a grant of $50 000.

CSIRO winners are:

2014 Matthew Hill – The development of metal–organic frameworks for practical industrial application
2009 Amanda Barnard – Modelling nanoparticles
2006 Dr Naomi McClure – Griffiths – Mapping the structure and evolution of our galactic home – the Milky Way

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Prime Minister’s Prize

The Prime Minister’s Prize for Science [external link] is the nation’s pre-eminent award for excellence in science. The Prize is a tribute to the contributions that Australian scientists have made to Australia’s and the world’s economic and social well-being, and is awarded for an outstanding specific achievement in any area of science advancing human welfare or benefiting society. In this context, science encompasses the physical, chemical, biological and technological sciences, mathematics and engineering.

The Prime Minister’s Prize for Science comprises a gold medallion and lapel pin, and a grant of $300 000.The Prime Minister’s Prize for Science replaced the Australia Prize in 2000.

CSIRO winners are:

2011 Ezio Rizzardo and Dave Solomon – For their role in revolutionising polymer science, also see: Nitroxide-mediated living radical polymerisation and RAFT polymerisation
2009 John O’Sullivan – For his achievements in astronomy and wireless technologies (see also Wireless LANs) – the patented technology behind WiFi networks
2007 Peter Waterhouse and Ming Bo Wang – Discovery of gene silencing with double stranded RNA (see also RNAi)
2000 Jim Peacock and Elizabeth Dennis – Discovery of the Flowering Switch Gene, a key gene in determining when plants end their vegetative growth phase and begin flowering (see also FLOWERING LOCUS C and its control of the initiation of flowering in plants)

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Science Minister’s Prize for Life Scientist

The Science Minister’s Prize for Life Scientist of the Year [external link] was initiated in 2000. It is awarded to a scientist at an early stage in their career (within 10 years of completing their PhD).

The prize is awarded for an outstanding achievement in science that advances, or has the potential to advance, human welfare or benefits society. The Prize is awarded only to an individual and comprises a silver medallion and lapel pin, and a grant of $50 000.

CSIRO winners are:

2007 Elizabeth FultonSimulations of marine ecosystem dynamics
2003 Christopher Helliwell – The isolation of the genes that control the biosynthesis of gibberellin one of the most important hormones in plants

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Victoria Prize

The Victoria Prize is awarded annually to an individual whose scientific discovery or technological innovation has significantly advanced knowledge or has potential to lead a commercial outcome or other benefit to the community.

Created in 1998, the Victoria Prize celebrates leadership, determination, endeavour and creativity and highlights the many ways in which research and development of international significance is conducted locally. It carries a cash reward of $50 000 to the winner plus a further $100 000 from the Anne and Eric Smorgon Memorial Award to the Institute where the Victoria Prize recipient conducted their research.

CSIRO recipients are:

2010 Wojciech (Voytek) Gutowski and his team – for the development of a breakthrough technology which completely eliminates waste and volatile solvent emissions from painting plastic surfaces
2008 Peter Colman – for his involvement in the biomolecular field and work on anti-influenza virus drugs
2006 David Solomon – for his seminal work in polymer chemistry, particularly the chemistry of plastics
2001 Roger Francey and Paul Steele – for their work on global warming and the improved measurement of greenhouse gases